The Self Imagined: Portraiture, Identity, and Difference in American Art

Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Research and Teaching Fellowship for American Art, Université Paris Nanterre and Université Paris-Diderot, 2018–20

For 2019-2020, the theme of the seminar will be The Self Imagined: Portraiture, Identity, and Difference in American Art. This course focuses on portraiture and images of the body in American art from the 1880s to the 1980s. It examines changes in the concept of selfhood in the U.S., while also exploring the ways in which various artistic practices have informed and altered perceptions and definitions of such identity categories as gender, race, and nationality. Paying close attention to individual works of art, the course analyses their role in the production, reproduction, and transformation of social practices, practices that are themselves contingent on the notions of belonging and difference. 

 

Fridays, 10:00-12:00
Terra Foundation for American Art Center, Conference Room
121 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris

Instructor: Tatsiana Zhurauliova

Course Description

This course will focus on portraiture and images of the body in American art from the 1880s to the 1980s. We will examine changes in the concept of selfhood in the U.S., while also reflecting on the ways in which various artistic practices have informed and altered perceptions and definitions of such identity categories as gender, race, and nationality. Looking closely at individual works of art, we will discuss their role in the production, reproduction, and transformation of social practices, practices that are themselves contingent on the notions of belonging and difference.

Evaluation

  • Attendance and participation in class discussions: 20%
  • Question for the class discussion based on a select required reading, 3 questions total for the semester, 15%:
    *Each student is asked to email the instructor a question that critically engages with a select required reading and that can provide basis for the class discussion that week. Each student is required to send no less than three questions over the course of the semester with each individual question focused on a separate reading. It is up to each student to choose weeks/readings for which they want to pose a question. Each question should be sent by email no later than 20:00 on Thursday, the day before the class meeting that week.
  • Oral presentation of an assigned topic, 2-3 students presenting each class: 20%
    *The presentation should be about 10 minutes and should include an analytical overview of a given text, its central argument and methodological approach. Students are expected to prepare a PowerPoint to accompany their presentation and to email it to the instructor in advance (the PowerPoint should be limited to 3-5 slides).
  • Short essay on an individual work of art (600-900 words), due November 8: 15%
  • Research paper (1500-2000 words), due at the end of semester: 30%

Readings: All books mentioned below are available at the Terra Library on reserve. Unless noted otherwise, all articles are available from Jstor and are downloadable at the Terra Library from a library computer.

 

Prochains rendez-vous :